7 Low-Calorie Beers That Don’t Suck

If you’re like a lot of people, you want to be a little more conscious of what you’re drinking – and that’s pretty cool. There’s no harm in being a little bit healthier, and there’s no reason to cut out beer entirely (unless your doctor orders it or something).

So why not switch to some low-calorie beers?

Before I continue, keep this in mind – beer has calories. If you’re trying to lose weight, I suggest switching to something with fewer calories. Water, maybe?

Or, you can always switch to beers that are popular for having fewer calories…Miller 64, Michelob Ultra or any light (or lite) beer will do. But those beers suck, and they aren’t even an efficient way to get a buzz.

So here it is! 7 beers I have personally tried that don’t suck and don’t have as many calories as you’d think. If you want to cut a few calories out, try starting with one of these beers!

Even Keel IPA – 114 Calories

Ever since my mother told me about this Ballast Point beer, I’m sort of hooked. I’ve always been a fan of the Sculpin IPA, but the Even Keel is a bit different. It’s got plenty of mango in it, especially as it warms up a little bit after opening. At 3.8% ABV, this low-calorie beer is perfect for a nice, summery day.

Guinness – 125 Calories

This could be one of the only times Guinness makes one of my lists. Guinness is fine, but as with any mass-produced beer, flavor often becomes a victim. But with only 125 calories, Guinness gets a pass as a low-calorie, drinkable beer. As an added bonus, it’s much better than plenty of other mass-produced beers.

But hey! Guinness isn’t the only low-cal, easy drinking Irish beer you can get. In fact, many European import beers are lighter than their American counterparts.

Down To Earth Session IPA – 150 Calories

21st Amendment Brewing is one of my personal favorites. While I’ve only had their Down To Earth Session IPA a few times, I’ve really enjoyed it. It’s 4.4% ABV – it’s a session, after all – and doesn’t make you feel like you’re going to burst out of your belt.

I’ll also take this time to say that 21st Amendment also produces some of my favorite artwork. A space chimp chilling on an island? A+ work.

All Day IPA – 147 Calories

Sticking under 150 calories, the All Day IPA by Founders Brewing Company is a solid low-calorie beer. Founders makes some pretty tasty beers in general, so if you happen to find this one sitting on the shelf at your local beer distributor, the 4.7% ABV and low-calorie count – along with my seal of approval – should convince you to try it out.

Firestone Walker DBA – 150 Calories

I can’t make a list without adding Firestone Walker, another one of my personal favorites. I’ve always loved the DBA, the flagship for Firestone Walker. While there are plenty of beers out there, I always end up coming back to the DBA. Oh, and with 150 calories and a 5% ABV, you’ll probably keep coming back to it, too.

Sierra Nevada Otra Vez – 137

Otra Vez, which in Spanish means “again” (or in your best DJ Khaled voice “another one”), is yet another California beer to make the list. Something about California and low-calorie beers, I suppose. Anyway, any Sierra Nevada beer is craft through and through, so you won’t be feeding the man any money with this. Also, it’s got an excellent grapefruit-ish flavor and a 4.5% ABV. Perfect for summer.

DayTime IPA – 98

Whaaaaat? A beer that’s below 100 calories and doesn’t completely suck?? That’s right! Not only is this Lagunitas beer a nice low cal option, but it actually tastes pretty good. However, the 4% ABV is well below most of Lagunitas’ normal beers. For reference, they have a 6% pils. Yeesh.

 

There you have it! 7 readily accessible, low-calorie beers that don’t suck. Got any low-calorie beers you enjoy that don’t start with Coors/Miller or end with Light/Lite? Share it in the comments!

Thomas Short

Thomas Short is a freelance writer based in Seattle, WA. His work has appeared in Entrepreneur, Huffington Post, The Mortgage Reports, and more. You can reach Thomas at tshortwriting.com.

Latest posts by Thomas Short (see all)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *